by Tyler Durden
February 18, 2013

from ZeroHedge Website

 

 

As the European parliament attempts to create a budget and Draghi repeats how the temporary lull in European growth is merely a prelude to a growth renaissance in the second half of the year (not to be confused with the verbatim lie rehashed by European dignitaries in 2012, 2011, 2010 and 2009), it appears a few leaks of truthiness are seeing daylight in the disunion.

 

In a shockingly frank interview, the CEO of Saxo Bank describes the Euro's recent rally as illusory and that "the whole thing is doomed," as the continent is not supported by a fiscal union.

 

As Bloomberg reports far below, Lars Seier Christensen says he would be a,

"seller of the EURO at anything near 1.40," noting that "right now we’re in one of those fake solutions where people think that the problem is contained or being addressed, which it isn’t at all."

Confirming that the only thing holding the farce together is political not economic efforts, he sums the situation up perfectly:

"people have been dramatically underestimating the problems."

Continuing,

Lars Seier Christensen, co-chief executive officer of Danish bank Saxo Bank A/S, said the euro’s recent rally is illusory and the shared currency is set to fail because the continent hasn’t supported it with a fiscal union.

 

“The whole thing is doomed,” Christensen said yesterday in an interview at the bank’s Dubai office.

 

“Right now we’re in one of those fake solutions where people think that the problem is contained or being addressed, which it isn’t at all.”

 

...

 

I’d be a bigger seller of the Euro at anything near 1.4,” according to Christensen, who said he isn’t making any speculative bets against the currency.

 

...

 

“Another possible fallout is getting rid of some of the countries that are being ruined by being in the euro, notably the southern European economies,” Christensen said.

 

“People have been dramatically underestimating the problems the French are going to get from this. Once the French get into a full- scale crisis, it’s over. Even the Germans cannot pay for that one and probably will not.”

 

...

 

Record Debt

 

Public-sector debt is at record levels, having more than doubled from 40 percent of gross domestic product in 2008.

 

The European Commission, which is due to update its forecasts this week, sees it rising to 97.1 percent of GDP next year.

“It’s the political world that has been extremely supportive of the euro, not for economic reasons but for political reasons,” said Christensen, a long-time critic of the single currency who now lives in Switzerland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Saxo Bank CEO Says...

Euro is Doomed as Currency Woes Resurface
by Mahmoud Kassem
February 18, 2013

from Bloomberg Website

 



Lars Seier Christensen, co-chief executive officer of Danish bank Saxo Bank A/S, said the euro’s recent rally is illusory and the shared currency is set to fail because the continent hasn’t supported it with a fiscal union.

“The whole thing is doomed,” Christensen said yesterday in an interview at the bank’s Dubai office. “Right now we’re in one of those fake solutions where people think that the problem is contained or being addressed, which it isn’t at all.”

 

 


Saxo Bank A/S co-Chief Executive Officer Lars Seier Christensen said,

“Right now we’re in one of those fake solutions where people think

that the problem is contained or being addressed, which it isn’t at all.”

Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
 

 

 


The European Central Bank forecasts

the euro-area economy will shrink 0.3 percent this year.

Photographer: Ralph Orlowski/Bloomberg
 

 

The Euro has gained 8.2 percent versus the dollar in the past six months and reached as high as $1.3711 on Feb. 1, the strongest since Nov. 14, 2011.

 

The European Central Bank forecasts the euro-area economy will shrink 0.3 percent this year and ECB President Mario Draghi said on Feb. 7 that the currency’s gains pose a risk for growth and inflation.

While the euro has strengthened, the economies of Germany, France and Italy all shrank more than estimated in the fourth quarter.

 

Ministers from the 17-member euro area met during the week to discuss aid to Cyprus and Greece as a tightening election contest in Italy and a political scandal in Spain threaten to reignite the region’s debt crisis.

“I’d be a bigger seller of the euro at anything near 1.4,” according to Christensen, who said he isn’t making any speculative bets against the currency.

The Euro declined 0.2 percent to 1.3332 against the dollar, falling for a fourth day.

 

 

 


Shrinking Investment

France is grappling with shrinking investment, job cuts by companies such as Renault SA and pressure from European partners to speed budget cuts.

 

While Germany expanded 0.7 percent last year, France posted no growth and Italy probably contracted more than 2 percent, the weakest in the euro area after Greece and Portugal, according to the European Commission.

The economy is on the brink of its third recession in four years and the highest joblessness since 1998.

 

Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said Feb. 13 the country won’t make its budget-deficit target of 3 percent of gross domestic product this year as the economy fails to generate growth and taxes.

“Another possible fallout is getting rid of some of the countries that are being ruined by being in the euro, notably the southern European economies,” Christensen said.

 

“People have been dramatically underestimating the problems the French are going to get from this. Once the French get into a full- scale crisis, it’s over. Even the Germans cannot pay for that one and probably will not.”


 

 

Cyprus Election

Cyprus has been shut out of debt markets for nearly two years with lenders including Bank of Cyprus Plc and Cyprus Popular Bank Plc losing 4.5 billion Euros ($6 billion) in Greece’s debt restructuring last year.

 

The nation is holding a presidential ballot today where the economy is the main issue rather than reunification of the divided island.

Spanish and Italian bonds rose last week as debt sales allayed concern the nations may struggle to raise funds before Italy goes to the polls to elect a new prime minister.

 

Yields on Spain’s 10-year bonds fell for the first week in five as European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said the country had achieved “enormous progress” in its reforms.

 

The spread between Spanish 10-year bonds and comparable German securities decreased two basis points to 354 basis points. Spain, which plans to sell three- and nine-month bills tomorrow and bonds maturing in 2015, 2019 and 2023 on Feb. 21, faces a sixth year of slump.

 

Output is forecast to contract for a second year in 2013 with unemployment at 27 percent amid the deepest budget cuts in the nation’s democratic history.

 

 

 


Record Debt

Public-sector debt is at record levels, having more than doubled from 40 percent of gross domestic product in 2008.

 

The European Commission, which is due to update its forecasts this week, sees it rising to 97.1 percent of GDP next year.

“It’s the political world that has been extremely supportive of the euro, not for economic reasons but for political reasons,” said Christensen, a long-time critic of the single currency who now lives in Switzerland.

TPG Capital, the private equity firm started by David Bonderman, bought a 30 percent stake in Saxo Bank in August 2011 for about $560 million. Christensen and co-founder and co-CEO Kim Fournais maintain majority ownership of the company.

The Hellerup, Denmark-based bank said in August that first half profit dropped to 44 million kroner ($7.8 million) from 346 million kroner a year earlier.